MIT ranks #1 for fourth year


For the fourth consecutive year, MIT has been named the top engineering school in the country by US News & World Report in its annual ranking of "America's Best Graduate Schools."

The magazine's March 22 issue has MIT at the top of the list of 193 accredited engineering schools offering master of science and doctoral degrees.

In other graduate programs surveyed, MIT was first in chemistry ahead of Caltech, Stanford, Harvard and the University of California at Berkeley (all tied for second), tied for first in computer science and mathematics; tied for second in physics and biology, second in geology, and sixth in management.

The rankings were compiled on the basis of such criteria as faculty resources, research activity, student selectivity and institutional reputation. To determine reputation, the magazine surveyed engineering school deans, deans of academic affairs and practicing engineers.

Among engineering schools, MIT ranked first reputationally and for its research activity and achieved an overall score of 100. The other schools in the top five were Stanford University (87.2), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (84.8), University of California at Berkeley (81.6) and Purdue University (80.3).

The engineering deans also ranked MIT as best in the nation in seven of 12 academic categories: aerospace, chemical, computer, electrical/electronic, materials/metallurgical, mechanical and nuclear. The Institute ranked fifth in biomedical and third in civil. It did not place in the top five for the categories of environmental, industrial/manufacturing and petroleum.

Among the 25 leading graduate business programs, the Sloan School of Management was ranked sixth in the nation behind Harvard, Stanford, the University of Pennsylvania (Wharton), Northwestern (Kellogg) and the University of Michigan.

In specialty categories, Sloan was ranked first in three areas-management information systems, production/operations management and transportation/logistics-and fourth in both finance and in real estate.

A version of this
article appeared in the
March 17, 1993

issue of MIT Tech Talk (Volume
37, Number
26).


Topics: Education, teaching, academics

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