Professor Harald Reiche dies


Services were held at Mount Auburn Cemetery July 29 for Professor Emeritus of History Harald A.T.O. Reiche, 72, who died on July 25.

A classical scholar, Professor Reiche was the author or co-author of several books and many articles on classical history and thought. He became particularly interested in Greek cosmology and astronomy and wrote and lecutred widely in that relatively unexplored field.

Professor Reiche was born in Germany in 1922 and studied in Switzerland before emigrating to the United States where he was graduated from Phillips Academy. After service in the US Army during World War II, he received the AB degree in classics from Harvard in 1943. where he also received the AM (1944) and PhD (1955) degrees.

He was appointed assistant professor of classics and philosophy at MIT in 1955 and helped to organize, design and teach the introductory humanities program. He also taught electives in Greek philosophy and language, ancient history and Roman political thought. He was promoted to associate professor in 1960 and to professor in 1966. He retired in 1991.

In addition, from 1980-90, Professor Reiche and his wife were faculty residents in Baker House, where they hosted Sunday evening suppers and symposia famous on the campus for good food and stimulating conversation.

Professor Reiche held a Carnegie Fellowship in humanities when he was first at MIT. Later he held a Guggenheim Fellowship in Athens and a Ford Foundation visitng professorship at the Technical University of Berlin. For many years he was also a lecturer in humanities and philosophy at Suffolk University.

Professor Reiche is survived by his wife, Irene Vojenko Reiche of Boston; a son, Christopher Reiche of Arlington; three daughters, Elizabeth Riddle of Syracuse, NY, Katharine Bigel of Seattle, WA, and Victoria Reiche of Geneva, Switzerland, and three grandsons. Remembrances may be made to the Baker House Fund, c/o Treasurer's Office, 238 Main St., Suite 200, Cambridge 02142.

A version of this
article appeared in the
August 17, 1994

issue of MIT Tech Talk (Volume
39, Number
2).


Topics: Obituaries

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