Talented teenagers to explore materials science at MIT


CAMBRIDGE, MA--On Saturday, Oct. 28, the MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering will host roughly 270 eighth- and ninth-grade students as well as their parents as they explore materials including glass, plastics and ceramics in workshops and presentations. Although registration is closed, the press is welcome at all sessions.

"We Live in a Materials World" is one of several materials-science events around the country this fall organized by the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University. CTY identifies young people with exceptional intellectual abilities and offers them accelerated academic programs at seven sites in the US. Six universities including MIT are hosting programs to introduce students and parents to materials technology and the important public policy and social questions that are attendant with technological development.

Speakers will address the role of materials in the arts and the evolution of civilization; the contemporary use of metals, ceramics, glasses and electronic materials; and the dependence of advanced engineering systems on new materials. There will be special emphasis on environmentally friendly processing of materials as well as the growing interest in biomaterials. Workshops will provide students with hands-on exposure to "smart" materials and to computer simulations in materials science.

"The field of materials science and engineering is not particularly well known to the public," said Ron Latanision, professor in that department and chairman of MIT's Council on Primary and Secondary Education. "So this is a wonderful opportunity for youngsters and their parents to get a first-hand view of what materials science is all about from a very distinguished department. Our faculty, staff and students will be on hand to meet our guests. This should be a wonderful day."

The MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering has been rated best in the nation in several recent studies, including a recent National Research Council ranking of doctoral programs and the 1995 US News and World Report survey of American universities.

The full program agenda is attached.

Center for Talented Youth

"WE LIVE IN A MATERIALS WORLD"
28 October 1995

GENERAL SESSION (Room 26-100)

9:00 a.m.
WELCOME
Angela Pond, Ctr for Talented Youth, Johns Hopkins U.

9:10 a.m.
REMARKS
Professor Ronald Latanision Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering Chair, MIT Council on Primary and Secondary Ed.

9:20 a.m.
KEYNOTE
A Materials World by Professor Thomas Eagar, Chairman, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

9:50 a.m.
SPECIAL LECTURE
Materials in the Arts by Professor Robert Ogilvie Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

10:30 a.m.
BREAK FOR PARENTS
DISMISSAL TO WORKSHOPS FOR STUDENTS

WORKSHOPS*
(parents in Room 26-100; students in various rooms)

10:50 a.m.
STUDENT WORKSHOP I

11:00 a.m.
PARENTS PRESENTATION I
Archeology and Materials of the Past by Professor Heather Lechtman Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

11:25 a.m.
STUDENT WORKSHOP II

11:30 a.m.
PARENTS PRESENTATION II
Ceramics by Professor Michael Cima Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

LUNCH

12: 00 p.m.
STUDENTS
Lobby 13 and Lobby 10 Rotunda
Hosts: DMSE Faculty and Students

PARENTS
Walker Dining Room
Hosts: MIT Admissions Director, Michael Behnke DMSE Faculty

WORKSHOPS*
(parents in Room 26-100; students in various rooms)

1:00 p.m.
STUDENT WORKSHOP III

PARENTS PRESENTATION III
Plastics by Professor Chris Scott Dept. of Materials Science and Eng.

1:35 p.m.
STUDENT WORKSHOP IV

1:30 p.m.
PARENTS PRESENTATION IV:
Biomaterials by Professor Linda Griffiths-Cima Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2:10 p.m.
STUDENT WORKSHOP V

2:00 p.m.
PARENTS PRESENTATION V
Quantum Dots by Professor Kirk Kolenbrander Dept. of Materials Science and Eng.

2:30 p.m.
BREAK FOR PARENTS

2:40 p.m.
STUDENTS RETURN TO ASSEMBLY (Room 26-100)

CLOSING SESSION (Room 26-100)

2:50 p.m.
PLENARY LECTURE
Materials and the Environment by Professor Donald Sadoway Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

3:30 p.m.
ADJOURN

*STUDENT WORKSHOPS
(Groups of 50 CTY students will move sequentially through each of five (5) workshops, 30 minutes each)

1. Computational Materials Chemistry, Prof. Gerbrand Ceder, Room 6-120
2. Fast Ion Conductors, Professor Harry Tuller, Room 4-149
3. Magnetic Materials, Dr. James Livingston, Room 4 -231
4. Shape Memory Alloys, Professor David Dunand, Room 10-250
5. Making Glass Strong and Safe, Prof. Yet-Ming Chiang, Room 4-163


Topics: Materials science, Volunteering, outreach, public service

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