Three honored for volunteer service


Vaughn Crayton, an engineering assistant in Physical Plant, and Salvation Army Captains Stephen and Betzann Carroll received the 1995 MIT President's Award for Community Service at a ceremony last week at the home of President and Mrs. Charles M. Vest.

The President's Award, inaugurated in 1994, is given to MIT employees and local volunteers in recognition of their volunteer and leadership activities in the Cambridge community.

For the past 16 years, Mr. Crayton has served more than 900 Cambridge youths as coach and referee in the Cambridge Youth Soccer League, and most recently, as a coach in the Cambridge Pop Warner Football League. During each fall and spring season, he devotes many hours to supporting healthy recreational opportunities for neighborhood children in Cambridge. Mr. Crayton is a resident of North Cambridge who has worked at MIT for nine years. His coaching began with his daughter's youth soccer team and culminated this season with his C-team (10- to 12-year-olds) becoming Boston League champions.

City Councilor Anthony Galluccio introduced Mr. Crayton, saying "when the Pop Warner program needed a new facility, Vaughn came in with plans he drafted himself on his own time. He's an excellent role model for these kids."

"Cambridge is a better place for our children because of Vaughn Crayton. Our young people need strong teachers, counselors, and coaches to look up to today more than ever," President Vest said.

The Carrolls--a husband and wife team--have dedicated a lifetime of service to the Salvation Army. Together they have 33 years of experience as captains in the Salvation Army, and since 1991, they have served as core officers for the Cambridge chapter. Under their guidance and leadership, the Cambridge Salvation Army serves 196,000 meals each year; provides a day care center aiding over 100 homeless children annually; operates a men's shelter with 50 beds, a seniors program and a medical clinic, and assists 200 people daily at a drop-in center.

The Carrolls were presented by Cambridge Mayor Kenneth Reeves, who pointed out that the Salvation Army shelter, unlike most, assists the homeless of Cambridge 24 hours a day.

"This is the season when everyone becomes aware of the Salvation Army's work through their bell-ringing appeals, but this award recognizes the Salvation Army's work through all seasons," President Vest said.

"It is fitting that MIT formally recognize outstanding service to the Cambridge community. After all, MIT as an institution is a citizen of Cambridge, as are many of our faculty and staff, some of our alumni and most of our students," Dr. Vest concluded.

The award reception is arranged by MIT's Office of Government and Community Relations.

A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on November 29, 1995.


Topics: Cambridge, Boston and region, Volunteering, outreach, public service

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