Images on display


There are currently several exhibitions of photographs and other images around MIT. Published in the July/August 1992 issue of Extra! issued by Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting, this image above is among those featured in War, Women and Wealth: Western Representations Of Islam in Caricatures and Cartoons, an exhibition by Omar Khalidi, reference librarian with the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture. The show, sponsored by MIT Campus Committee on Race Relations and on view at Rotch Library (Rm 7-238) through the summer, explores "how stereotypes can become derisive and insulting," said Mr. Khalidi. For more information, call Omar Khalidi, x8-5597 or send e-mail to .

"Young Man" (above right, gelatin silver print, 16" x 20" framed, 1994) by Mark Ostow, is one of a series of black-and-white photographic portraits of people from Berlin, NH, a small papermill town. "This is a place where you can still talk to people. a place where people still matter," said Mr. Ostow, a freelance photographer. Return to Berlin, New Hampshire runs through June 19. The Dean's Gallery is located in Rm E52-466 at the Sloan School of Management and is open weekdays 8am-5pm. The exhibition has been funded by a grant from the Council for the Arts. For more information, call x3-9455 or .

A festival atmosphere accompanied Christo's 1995 wrapping of the German Reichstag as shown in this scene (below right) photographed by Camila Chaves Cortes, research fellow in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Berlin Facades 1994-95, a photography and video exhibition on view at the Rotch Library of Architecture and Urban Studies (Rm 7-238) through May, examines the changes in Berlin as a result of the governmental move to Bonn. The show also features manipulated hand-painted Polaroid transfers of the Berlin Wall and The Legend of the Reichstag, a 20-minute video on the history of the Reichstag and the process of the wrapping. The exhibition can also be seen on the Web at .

A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on May 22, 1996.


Topics: Arts

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