MBTA bus service now connects Kendall Square with Sullivan Station


The MBTA has expanded its Crosstown 2 (CT2) bus route, providing a link between Kendall Square and Sullivan Station.

The new extension from Sullivan Station on the Orange line (near the Charlestown/Somerville border) offers a direct connection for residents of the Wellington/Harrington section of Cambridge, East Somerville and Union Square; Orange line commuters from north of Boston; and riders of buses 92, 93 (Charlestown), 95 (Medford, Somerville), 89 (Somerville) 101 (Malden, Medford, Somerville), 104 (Malden, Everett), 105 (Malden, Everett) and 109 (Everett).

Passengers riding from Sullivan Station can remain on the bus at Kendall Square to reach the other areas serviced by CT2&emdash;the middle and west end of MIT's campus, Boston University (BU), the Fenway, Longwood Medical Area, Huntington Avenue and Ruggles Station.

CT2 operates Monday-Friday, 5:55am-7:38pm. Service runs every 20 minutes during peak commuter hours, and every 30-35 minutes during the middle of the day. The mid-day trip between Sullivan and Kendall Square stations takes about 12 minutes; peak commuter hour trips are scheduled to take 20 minutes.

Cambridge stops are Cambridge Street at Windsor Street, One Kendall Square at Hampshire Street and Broadway, the Kendall Square MBTA, Vassar Street at Massachusetts Avenue, and Amesbury Street at Memorial Drive (Hyatt Regency).

Fare for the Crosstown buses is 75 cents; riders may use a bus pass or subway/bus combo pass, or, for the Crosstown buses only, a subway pass.

This extension is part of the MBTA's effort to initiate service along the projected corridor of the Urban Ring, a proposed circumferential service planned to link residential and employment nodes located just outside of the center of Boston. Other crosstown routes are: CT1&emdash;offering express service between BU Medical Center and Central Square Cambridge; and CT3&emdash;linking Logan Airport with Longwood Medical Area via Andrew Station and Ruggles Station.

For more information, see the MBTA web site.

A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on September 20, 2000.


Topics: Cambridge, Boston and region

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