Statements on Visualizing Cultures


MIT's home page recently featured a research and educational project -- Visualizing Cultures -- that has generated a great deal of concern and debate. The following statements speak to these issues.

Statement from MIT Chancellor Phillip L. Clay - April 27,
2006
Statement from Professors Dower and Miyagawa
- April 27, 2006
Statement from MIT President Susan Hockfield - May 4,
2006
Statement from MIT Faculty - May 23, 2006

Statement from MIT Chancellor Phillip L. Clay

April 27, 2006

Visualizing Cultures is an interdisciplinary research project, history course and educational outreach program that uses historical images and texts of different cultures in order to learn from them. We deeply regret that a section of this web site has caused distress and pain to members of the Chinese community.

Visualizing Cultures is an important and pioneering undertaking by two esteemed members of our faculty, Professor John Dower of the history faculty and Professor Shigeru Miyagawa of linguistics and of foreign languages and literatures. Professors Dower and Miyagawa have MIT's strongest support.

One section of the web site -- Throwing Off Asia -- authored by Professor Dower, refers to the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-1895 and displays images of Japanese wood-block prints that were used as wartime propaganda. Some of these images show the atrocities of war and are examples of how societies use visual imagery as propaganda to further their political agendas. The use of these historical images is not an endorsement of the events depicted.

Many readers, however, have indicated that the purpose of the project is not sufficiently clear to counteract the negative messages within the historical images portrayed on the site. Professors Dower and Miyagawa have been meeting with members of the MIT Chinese community to discuss their concerns and have temporarily taken down the web site while these concerns are being addressed.

The response from some outside the community, on the other hand, has been inappropriate and antithetical to the mission and spirit of MIT and of any university. This is not only unfair to our colleagues, but contrary to the very essence of the university as a place for the free exploration of ideas and the embrace of intellectual and cultural diversity. In the spirit of collaboration, MIT encourages an open and constructive dialogue.

We need to preserve the ability to confront the difficult parts of human history if we are to learn from them.

Phillip L. Clay
Chancellor

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Statement from Professors Dower and Miyagawa

April 27, 2006

We wish to express our deep regret over the emotional distress caused by some of the imagery and are genuinely sorry that the web site has caused pain within the Chinese community. This was completely contrary to our intention. Our purpose is to look at history in the broadest possible manner and to try to learn from this.

One section of the project displays images of Japanese wood-block prints that were used as propaganda during the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-1895 and are examples of how societies use visual imagery to further their political agendas. These historical images do not reflect our beliefs. To the contrary, our intent was to illuminate aspects of the human experience -- including imperialism, racism, violence and war -- that we must confront squarely if we are to create a better world. These complex issues are addressed in the long text that accompanies the images. We must learn from history if we are to have a better future.

Many people who have seen the web site, however, have indicated that the purpose of the project is not sufficiently clear to counteract the negative messages contained in the historical images portrayed on the site. Acknowledging this, we have been meeting with members of the Chinese community and others here at MIT to discuss how we might present these materials in a way that more effectively fosters understanding across cultures. In the meantime, we have temporarily taken down this web site while these community concerns are being addressed. We wish to make clear that this is a scholarly research project, and there is no art exhibition associated with it.

We are grateful to those members of the MIT Chinese community who have met with us to address this issue and help heal our community. In these discussions, we have been guided by the central values of the university: the free exploration of ideas and the embrace of intellectual and cultural diversity. We are committed to those ideals.

John W. Dower
Professor of History

Shigeru Miyagawa
Professor of Linguistics and of Foreign Languages and Literatures

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Statement
from President Susan Hockfield

May 4, 2006

The Visualizing Cultures web site will be relaunched within the next few days.  This
project -- the work of two outstanding members of our faculty -- is in the
finest traditions of MIT:  deep and rigorous scholarship, pioneering and
innovative pedagogy and a commitment to serve society.  Drawing on these
traditions, the project illuminates complex historical and cultural issues.

The web site will include all the original materials as well as added context
and navigational aids that have been developed in response to thoughtful comments
by members of our community. Unfortunately, among the comments received over
the past week from all over the world were some that were abusive or threatening
to the authors; some called for the web site to be suppressed and/or for the
Institute to take action against Professors Dower and Miyagawa. 

We affirm in the strongest way possible our support for the work of these
professors, and for the principles of academic freedom.   While some
of the text and images on the web site are painful to see, the attacks on our
colleagues and their work are antithetical to all that we stand for as a university
dedicated to open inquiry and the free exchange of ideas. As scholars and educators,
we have an obligation to explore complex and controversial ideas, and to do
so in a manner that respects those with whom we may disagree.  

As Visualizing Cultures is relaunched, we hope people will read the text,
view the images and consider the important questions the authors raise.  They
welcome, and we all benefit from, thoughtful discourse and the learning that
results from serious intellectual engagement with these matters.

Susan Hockfield
President, MIT

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Statement by MIT faculty

May 23, 2006

As faculty members of MIT, we endorse in the strongest terms
the scholarly value of the Visualizing Cultures project directed by Professors
John Dower and Shigeru Miyagawa. This prize-winning web site was created
by two of the world���s leading scholars. By going to visualizingcultures.mit.edu,
readers of this letter can see for themselves how, by bringing together textual
explanation with thousands of images, the web site explores in detail the
development of Japan���s relationship to Western powers and China since the mid-nineteenth
century.

It also evokes broader questions about the cultures of war, imperialism,
and nationalism. Many of the subjects it analyzes are painful to recall,
but since the authors are professional scholars of the highest caliber,
the site in its entirety enlightens everyone who examines it carefully
about the deepest questions of social and historical change. Because
it brings advanced technology together with humanistic research, it
is a jewel of the MIT curriculum, and the Open Course Ware project makes
it available to the entire world.

A small group of individuals took one image on this site out of context
and broadcast it across the Internet. By doing so, they fomented
an email campaign directed against MIT���s educational mission that quickly
exploded out of control into a global incident. The site was temporarily
shut down in response to these attacks. Some critics claim that the
site endorses Japanese racism and militarism and therefore urge that
it be permanently shut down or substantively revised. In fact, the
site describes and strongly condemns the racist propaganda that supported
Japanese militarism.

The challenge to this project threatens the core values of MIT���s
educational and research mission. We commend the eloquent statement
from President Susan Hockfield in support of the project. We call
on all interested parties to join with us to ensure that the Visualizing
Cultures web site will remain in its entirety and be protected against
any future attacks. We also express our strong sympathy to Professors
Dower and Miyagawa for the ordeal they have suffered, and reaffirm
our commitment to MIT���s basic values of academic freedom and scholarly
integrity.

  • Hal Abelson, Class of 1922 Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer
    Science
  • Alice Amsden, Barton L. Weller Professor of Political Economy
  • John Belcher,
    Class of 1922 Professor of Physics, MacVicar Faculty Fellow
  • Rafael
    Luis Bras, Edward A Abdun-Nur Professor Department of Civil and Environmental
    Engineering
  • David M. Ciarlo, Assistant Professor, History Faculty
  • Joshua Cohen, Professor
    of Philosophy, Political Science
  • Isabelle de Courtivron, A.F. Friedlaender
    Professor of the Humanities, MacVicar Fellow, Foreign Languages and Literatures
  • Jesus
    Del Alamo, Professor of Electrical Engineering, Macvicar Faculty Fellow
  • Peter
    Donaldson, Professor of Literature
  • Herbert H. Einstein, Professor, Civil and
    Environmental Engineering
  • Howard Eissenstat, Lecturer, History Faculty
  • Michael Fischer, Professor of
    Anthropology and Science Technology Studies
  • Deborah Fitzgerald, Professor
    of Science, Technology and Society, Associate Dean, School of Humanities,
    Arts, and Social Sciences
  • Suzanne Flynn, Professor of Linguistics
  • Daniel Fox, Associate professor of
    Linguistics
  • Lorna Gibson, Matoula S. Salapatas Professor of Materials Science
    and Engineering, Chair of the Faculty
  • Loren Graham, Professor
    of the History of Science
  • Stephen Graves, Abraham Siegel Professor of Management
  • Hugh Gusterson, Associate
    Professor of Anthropology and Science Studies
  • Morris Halle, Insitute Professor
    Emeritus, Department of Linguistics and Philosophy
  • Ellen Harris, Professor
    of Music
  • James Harris, Professor Emeritus of Spanish and Linguistics
  • Wesley Harris,
    Head, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • Irene Heim, Professor of
    Linguistics
  • Harold F. Hemond, William E. Leonhard Professor of Civil
    and Environmental Engineering
  • Diana Henderson, Associate
    Professor of Literature, Secretary of the Faculty
  • Jean E. Jackson, Head, Anthropology
  • Meg Jacobs, Associate Professor of History
  • Patrick Jaillet, Edmund K. Turner
    Professor, Head, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Kenneth
    Keniston, Mellon Professor Emeritus of Science, Technology, Society
  • Michael
    Kenstowicz, Professor of Linguistics
  • Samuel Jay Keyser, Professor Emeritus,
    Department of Linguistics and Philosophy
  • George Kocur, Civil and Environmental
    Engineering
  • Steven Lerman, Class of 1922 Professor and
    Director of CECI, Department of Civil and Environmental
    Engineering
  • Pauline R. Maier, William R. Kenan Jr Professor of History
  • Roger G. Mark, Professor
    of HST and EECS
  • Anne M. McCants, Associate Professor of History
  • David A. Mindell, Frances and
    David Dibner Professor of the History of Engineering and Manufacturing
  • Joel
    Moses, Institute Professor, Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
    Systems
  • Dava J. Newman, Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering
    Systems
  • Steven E Ostrow, Lecturer,
    History Faculty
  • Peter C. Perdue, T.T. and Wei Fong
    Chao Professor of Asian Civilizations
  • Ruth Perry, Professor of Literature
  • David Pesestsky, Ferrari P. Ward Professor
    of Linguistics
  • Jeffrey S. Ravel, Associate Professor of History
  • Norvin Richards, Associate
    Professor of Linguistics
  • Harriet Ritvo, Arthur J. Conner Professor of History
  • Richard J. Samuels, Ford
    International Professor of Political Science, Director, Center for International
    Studies
  • Bish Sanyal, Professor of Urban Planning, Director,
    SPURS/HHH
  • Merritt Roe Smith, Leverett Howell and William King
    Cutten Professor of the History of Technology
  • Bob
    Stalnaker, Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Philosophy
  • Edward S. Steinfeld,
    Associate Professor of Political Science
  • Peter Temin, Elisha Gray II Professor
    of Economics
  • Emma Teng, Associate Professor of Chinese Studies
  • Bruce Tidor, Professor of
    Biological Engineering and Computer Science, Associate
    Chair of the Faculty
  • Edward Turk, The John E.
    Burchard Professor of Humanities
  • Daniele Veneziano, Professor,
    Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Julian Wheatley, Senior Lecturer
    in Chinese
  • Ann Wolpert, Director of Libraries
  • Evan Ziporyn, Kenan Sahin Distinguished
    Professor of Music, Head, Music and Theater
    Arts

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Topics: Education, teaching, academics

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