• If you live on the MIT campus in Institute-approved housing (which includes all residence halls, fraternities, sororities and independent living groups), then you need to be counted by filling out a census form.

    U.S. Census Bureau, Public Information Office

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Fill out your census form and be counted!

An important message to members of the MIT community who live on campus


April 1, 2010, is National Census Day. The census, a count of all people who currently reside in the United States, takes place every 10 years and is a vital exercise for the nation. The confidential data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau are used for purposes as wide-ranging as the allocation of funding for transportation services, public safety and road repair; the determination of the number of seats in the House of Representatives; planning for emergency preparedness; and a host of other public priorities that impact every person in the United States.

MIT cares about the collection of census data. Research efforts in sociology, economics, political science, urban studies and many other disciplines rely on the accurate compilation of information about the residents of our country. Census data are also used to determine funding for critical tuition grant and loan programs.

Like every college and university, MIT is required by the federal government to count each person who resides in Institute-approved housing on our campus. That includes undergraduate and graduate students, housemasters, resident advisors, graduate resident tutors, post-doctoral scholars and any other visiting scientists, scholars or faculty members — more than 6,000 people in all.

If you live on the MIT campus in Institute-approved housing (which includes all residence halls, fraternities, sororities and independent living groups), then you need to be counted by filling out a census form.

It doesn’t matter if you are a resident of another state, a citizen of another country or registered to vote in your hometown, you need to be counted here on campus.

All you have to do is fill out the brief questionnaire that will be provided to you by your house manager or resident advisor. The form asks for basic personal information and takes just a few minutes to complete and return.

Your responses to the census questions will not be shared with anyone. All data collected by the U.S. Census are confidential, and according to federal law cannot be distributed to another governmental agency or organization of any kind.

Please take a look at MIT’s Census 2010 web site http://web.mit.edu/census/ to learn more about the census effort at MIT. If you have any questions, kindly address them to census2010@mit.edu. Thank you for your part in ensuring the MIT provides a full and accurate count to the U.S. Census Bureau!


Topics: Census, Faculty, MIT Administration, Staff, Students

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