• At the entrance to the Alcator C-Mod Control Room, Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick greets PSFC Director Miklos Porkolab, along with senior officers of the Research, Development, and Technical Employees Union.

    Photo: Paul Rivenberg

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  • Atop the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, Dr. Earl Marmar shows Gov. Patrick and U.S. Rep. Jay Inslee some of the technology involved in running the machine.

    Photo: Paul Rivenberg

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  • Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering Professor Ian Hutchinson shows Gov. Patrick the Alcator C-Mod Control Room.

    Photo: Paul Rivenberg

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  • Prior to the tour, Alcator Project Head Earl Marmar, left, greets U.S. Rep. Michael Capuano (D-Mass.) accompanied by, from left to right, PSFC Director Miklos Porkolab, and officers of the Research, Development and Technical Employees' Union, Roger Shields and Alan Morrison.

    Photo: Paul Rivenberg

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Mass. Gov. Patrick, U.S. Reps. Capuano and Inslee visit Alcator C-Mod

Learn about fusion and its prospects as a green energy source


On March 9, Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick and U.S. Rep. Jay Inslee (D-Wash.), followed shortly after by U.S. Rep. Michael Capuano (D-Mass.), toured the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center’s (PSFC) Alcator C-Mod tokamak.

Concerned that the Department of Energy's Presidential 2013 budget guidance would shut down MIT’s Alcator C-Mod fusion project, the governor and representatives came to the facility to learn more about fusion, its prospects for development as a green energy source, and specifically how Alcator C-Mod complements other national and international fusion facilities and programs.

Hosted by PSFC Director Miklos Porkolab, Alcator Project Head Earl Marmar and PFSC Associate Director Martin Greenwald, the guests toured the C-Mod control room, the power conversion room and the tokamak test cell.

Capuano, whose district includes MIT, took time during his visit to meet with union representatives to discuss jobs that would be at risk with funding cuts.

Since the funding cuts have been proposed, interest in MIT’s fusion program has increased among Congressional Representatives, and further visits are expected.


Topics: Department of Energy (DoE), Fusion, Government, Nuclear science and engineering, Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Policy

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