Zue honored with IEEE speech and audio processing award


Victor Zue, the Delta Electronics Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and a principal investigator at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, has been named the recipient of the IEEE James L. Flanagan Speech and Audio Processing Award. Zue was honored for his "pioneering contributions to acoustic phonetics and conversational spoken-language systems.”

In the early part of his career, Zue conducted research in acoustic phonetics and phonology, codifying the acoustic manifestation of speech sounds and the phonological rules governing the realization of pronunciation in American English. Subsequently, his research interests shifted toward the development of spoken language interfaces to make human-computer interactions more natural. Between 1989 and 2001, he led the Spoken Language Systems Group at the MIT Laboratory for Computer Science, which has pioneered the development of many systems that enable a user to interact with computers using spoken language.

Zue’s current research interests are in the area of applying human language technologies to enable easy access of structured and unstructured information from the Web, especially in application areas such as education and health care.

The IEEE James L. Flanagan Speech and Audio Processing Award was established in 2002 to recognize outstanding contributions to the advancement of speech and/or audio signal processing.


Topics: Awards, honors and fellowships, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), Electrical Engineering & Computer Science (eecs), Faculty, Human-computer interaction, IEEE, Spoken language systems, Victor Zue

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