• Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi observes data and images from the Alcator C-Mod tokamak on screens in the control room. Guided by Assistant Professor Anne White (right) she was joined by Vice President for Research Maria Zuber and PSFC Director Miklos Porkolab (front row). Also present (back row from right) were Alcator Project Head Earl Marmar, Principal Research Scientist Amanda Hubbard and Pelosi Advance Director Mary-Kate Barry.

    Photo: Paul Rivenberg

    Full Screen
  • Graduate student Bob Mumgaard explains the operation of Alcator's McPherson spectrometer, which measures the temperature of the electrons in the plasma.

    Photo: Paul Rivenberg

    Full Screen
  • White escorts Pelosi to the top of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak.

    Photo: Paul Rivenberg

    Full Screen
  • Pelosi discusses MIT fusion research atop the Alcator C-Mod tokamak with White.

    Photo: Paul Rivenberg

    Full Screen
  • Alcator Project Head Earl Marmar introduces Congresswoman Pelosi to Alcator C-Mod, joined by Principal Research Scientist Amanda Hubbard and Alcator Administrator Jessica Coco.

    Photo: Paul Rivenberg

    Full Screen

Nancy Pelosi visits Plasma Science and Fusion Center


United States Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi, the U.S. House Democratic Leader, visited the Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC) on Oct. 31 to learn about MIT’s fusion experiment, Alcator C-Mod. The C-Mod tokamak has gained the interest of many members of Congress in the past several years as a result of fusion’s potential as a source of practically limitless source of clean energy.

Pelosi was welcomed by PSFC Director Prof. Miklos Porkolab, Alcator C-Mod Project Head Dr. Earl Marmar, PSFC Associate Director Dr. Martin Greenwald, and NSE Assistant Prof. Anne White. Also present were MIT Co-Director for the Office of Government and Community Relations Paul Parravano, and Vice President for Research Prof. Maria Zuber. The visit was arranged by MIT alumnus Reiner Beeuwkes '67, who also attended. C-Mod research and technical staff, as well as students, were at their stations in the control room during her visit.

Talking with staff and graduate students, Pelosi spent more than an hour learning about C-Mod’s decades-long research into understanding the physics of hot magnetically confined fusion plasmas, its potential for the future as the fuel for clean fusion energy, its meaning to the lives of those who have worked on it, and the most recent funding issues. The experiment is currently in “warm shutdown” status, with staff prepared to restart the experiment should funding became available based on Congressional action on the fiscal year 2014 budgets.


Topics: Energy, Fusion, Government, Plasma Science and Fusion Center

Comments

Back to the top